Tyler1 looking unimpressed on stream
Screenshot via loltyler1 on Twitch

Tyler1 slams ‘paycheck-stealing LCS players’ for allegedly ‘openly griefing’ LoL matches

Tyler1 sounded off after accusing a former MVP of griefing his solo queue games.

In a recent stream, League of Legends streamer Tyler1 spoke about LCS players with his usual forgiving, friendly on-stream tone, calling LCS pros “fucking disgusting, social anixety-ridden fuckfaces” before comparing the “dogshit” North American game state to the way pros treat their careers in other regions. 

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These comments were prompted by a solo queue game in which Team Liquid support CoreJJ appeared to be playing below an acceptable level, displaying bizarre movement patterns and making plays that one wouldn’t expect out of one of the most decorated LCS players of all time. Immediately following that game, Tyler1 dissected the gameplay of CoreJJ, VOD-reviewing moments in which Tyler1 accused the former world champion of “openly griefing” and “running it down.” 

“People wonder why I despise these dogshit paycheck-stealing LCS players so much, that’s why, bro.” Tyler1 said. “Until I ever see any of these fucking disgusting social anxiety ridden fuckfaces perform, unfortunately they all do the same shit.”

Tyler1 referred to Academy players with an especially visceral tone, calling them “a complete waste of everybody’s time” considering the fact they play professional League for a salary that’s lower than the average pro with no guarantee of a future career in the game’s scene. The only player that earned an honorable exoneration from Tyler1 was former Cloud9 support Zven, who the streamer lauded for the emotion that he shows in solo queue games. 

At least he’s consistent, though. Last summer, during the LCS walkout which paused the start of the second half of the season, Tyler1 also used the term “paycheck thieves” to describe the greater professional NA playerbase, especially targeting Academy players then, too. 

The main point Tyler1 attempted to convey between his barrages of strung-together insults was that North American players have essentially given up on their careers and have become complacent—a point that’s been regurgitated throughout the League scene since the introduction of franchising, 

Tyler1 once again pointed a finger at CoreJJ—who is not a native North American player—implying the region has had a negative influence on him: “He’s been here too long, that’s his problem. The money’s been made.” 

In contrast, Tyler1 praised Korean and Chinese League players for their enthusiasm and willingness to flame others in a solo queue environment. It’s particularly ironic Tyler1 made an effort to applaud the efforts of Korean and Chinese League pros in this clip, especially considering just over a year ago, he referred to all LCK and LPL players as “frauds” in another livestream when dissecting the gameplay of Gen.G mid laner Chovy.


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Author
Michael Kelly
Staff Writer covering World of Warcraft and League of Legends, among others. Mike's been with Dot since 2020, and has been covering esports since 2018.