Magic: The Gathering’s most-played Standard cards are all Green

The masses are all playing Green cards.

Flaxen Intruder Promo Art Magic Throne of Eldraine
Image via Wizards of the Coast Magic: The Gathering

The Standard 2020 metagame is lopsided. The 10 most-played cards in Magic: The Gathering competitive tournaments are all Green. 

Oko, Thief of Crowns is taking over Magic’s meta across multiple formats, including Standard. Even prior to the Field of the Dead ban, archetypes playing Green were dominating the Standard meta thanks to a combination of cards that shut down other archetypes and provide mana ramp.

Here are the 10 most-played cards in competitive Standard tournaments since the release of Throne of Eldraine, according to recorded statistics from MTG Goldfish.

  • Once Upon a Time: Played in 56 percent of decks with four copies.
  • Paradise Druid: Played in 57 percent decks with 3.8 copies.
  • Gilded Goose: Played in 49 percent decks with four copies.
  • Nissa, Who Shakes the World: Played in 53 percent decks with 3.7 copies.
  • Oko, Thief of Crowns: Played in 48 percent decks with four copies.
  • Wicked Wolf: Played in 49 percent decks with 3.9 copies.
  • Hydroid Krasis: Played in 44 percent decks with four copies.
  • Veil of Summer: Played in 72 percent decks with 2.4 copies.
  • Questing Beast: Played in 49 percent decks with 3.5 copies.
  • Lovestruck Beast: Played in 44 percent decks with 3.4 copies.

The No. 11 spot is occupied by Noxious Grasp, also known as the Oko, Nissa, and Teferi killer. The top 15 also includes Blue cards like Aether Gust and Disdainful Stroke, which are primarily being played in sideboards as an answer to Oko and Nissa. 

There are some brave players who are moving away from Oko, but most of these new decks still include many of the Green cards listed above.

Related: MTG Arena MCQ metagame is a hot Oko mess

The meta is unlikely to change much since Mythic Championship VI is less than two weeks away. The next Banned and Restricted announcement isn’t scheduled until Nov. 18.