How to save streams on Twitch

Save the moment.
Image via Twitch

Twitch doesn’t keep your videos and streams on the website forever.

Downloading Twitch streams to your computer is the most surefire way to guarantee the moments you have with your community are kept saved forever.

With a few quick clicks of a button, you can download your broadcasts to keep in a file on your computer or hard drive, even if they don’t stay in Twitch’s archives. 

To start the process, you’ll want to click your profile picture in the top right corner of Twitch’s homepage and select “Creator Dashboard” from the dropdown menu that appears.

Image via Twitch

Once you’re there, you can click the “Content” drop down on the left side of your screen and select “Video Producer” to open up all the videos and past broadcasts for your channel. 

Then select the broadcast that you’d like to save. Once you click on it, a Video Preview should pop out, and at the top of that preview there is a list of options. 

Along with being able to export, share, and unpublish the clip, there is a “Download” option. Clicking that will begin the process of preparing your broadcast and downloading it.

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Author
Max Miceli
Senior Staff Writer. Max graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a journalism and political science degree in 2015. He previously worked for The Esports Observer covering the streaming industry before joining Dot where he now helps with Overwatch 2 coverage.