Tindral Sageswift boss in his boss room in Amirdrassil
Image via Blizzard Entertainment

All WoW Dragonflight Amirdrassil Race to World First boss kills by guild, pull count

The final two bosses of Amirdrassil had some of the highest pull counts in recent WoW history.

The final Race to World First of WoW Dragonflight has come to a close, and now, we can take a look at all of the data from the event. 

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Echo came out of the race as its winner, with the guild taking home its second RWF crown of Dragonflight after a grueling two weeks of boss-pulling, strategizing, and split-raiding. If nothing else, the Amirdrassil race will go down in the history books as an incredibly back-loaded event as the final two bosses of the raid were near-unbreakable brick walls in their own right. When compared to the first seven bosses of Amidrassil, Tindral Sageswift and Fyrakk were far more difficult encounters that tested the brainpower and mechanical skill of all guilds involved, with those two bosses taking several days and hundreds of pulls to take down each.  

Larodar Wow boss inside Amirdrassil, known as the Keeper of the Flame
Four different guilds claimed world-first kills across Amirdrassil’s nine bosses. Image via Blizzard Entertainment

Of course, pull count isn’t everything. In this race alone, we saw an extreme disparity between the number of pulls it took for guilds to kill certain bosses. Not only is the average item level of a guild’s lineup a major factor in deciding pull count but guilds’ playstyles also need to be taken into account when analyzing just how hard a world first kill actually was to obtain. 

Liquid and Echo, for example, tend to have high disparities in pull counts, with Echo tending to spend more time strategizing in between their pulls and leading to more downtime, while Liquid tend to rack up kills in quick succession.  When Fyrakk went down to Echo, Liquid were outpacing their EU rivals in pulls on the final boss, despite being just about even in percentage points. In total, it took Liquid 464 pulls on Fyrakk to claim world second, according to WoW stats site Raider.io.  

Regardless of playstyles and other important factors, a boss’ pull count is the oldest telltale metric of its difficulty. Below, you’ll find all of the Amirdrassil bosses’ pull counts, as well as the guilds who claimed world first on each of them.  

Amirdrassil Race to World First bosses sorted by pull count

BossWorld first guildPull count
GnarlrootBlue Shoe*
Igira the CruelInstant DollarsFour
VolcorossInstant DollarsOne
Council of DreamsInstant DollarsSeven
Larodar, Keeper of the FlameInstant Dollars24
Nymue, Weaver of the CycleInstant Dollars16
SmolderonTeam Liquid56
Tindral SageswiftTeam Liquid426
FyrakkEcho340
*All data via Raider.io. Data is unavailable for Blue Shoe.

It’s quite evident that, just by looking at how much effort was spent to take them down, Tindral Sageswift and Fyrakk were much more difficult in comparison to the rest of the bosses in the raid. The 766 pulls it took for Liquid and Echo to grab their respective world first kills on those two bosses are extremely indicative of the ramping difficulty that the final pair of bosses presented to the race’s top two contenders. In the end, the battle for world first on Fyrakk came down to less than one percentage point as Liquid and Echo were locked in what easily goes down as the most competitive (and arguably best) Race to World First in WoW history. 

Perhaps the biggest story of the race was the emergence of Instant Dollars, a guild that doesn’t play at the same pace as Liquid and Echo but still has enough talented veterans on its lineup to consistently be in the top 10 with each passing event. The guild has always been a consistent contender, but in this race, they became a definitive candidate to be considered one of the best in the world, managing to claim world first kills on more than half of the bosses in Amirdrassil despite being slightly behind Echo and Liquid’s split-raid-focused gearing curve. 

In total, it was those split raids that ultimately played a factor in Liquid and Echo’s ability to get to the end of the raid so quickly. By the time they got to the end of the race, the average item levels of both guilds sat in the high 470s—a number that was only attainable thanks to the endless hours put toward grinding split raids at the start of the race. 

Now, we’ll have to wait at least another year before the next iteration of the Race to World First. Amirdrassil was the final raid of Dragonflight, and it’s going to be at least a full turn of the calendar until the release of WoW’s next expansion, The War Within. Until then, Echo remain on top of the competitive WoW scene, having won their fourth Race to World First all-time in Amirdrassil. 


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Michael Kelly
Staff Writer covering World of Warcraft and League of Legends, among others. Mike's been with Dot since 2020, and has been covering esports since 2018.