Dota 2 might be gearing up for a better new player experience

No more being thrown in the deep end.

Image via Valve

This article is brought to you by StatBanana, the best Dota 2 strategy tool.


Valve’s Dota 2 is known for many things. The game consistently sets the bar for a competition’s prize pool with The International, has some of the most exciting moments in esports, and a massive hero pool that’s unlocked from the start—at the detriment of having a learning curve the size of Mount Everest.

And now, a Reddit user has discovered deleted strings named “missions” that new players might be able to complete, giving them time to discover Dota 2‘s mechanics at their own leisure.

The strings include titles such as “The Basics,” “Farming and Items,” “Teamfighting,” and “Hero Mastery.” These are important components of the game taken apart, which gives disoriented novices ease of access and an easier time focusing.

In some scenarios, Valve might bring back classics such as the Shopkeeper’s Quiz, usually only available during compendiums, as a way to teach rookies item combinations.

The sections seem to contain advanced mechanics as well. Under the “Teamfighting” section, there are strings for “Echo Slamma Jamma,” presumably giving players the feeling of executing an amazing Echo Slam, and even more abstract concepts like “Counter-Initiation.”

https://preview.redd.it/fjdbvlarzse41.png?width=700&format=png&auto=webp&s=0740bf47124e59145222737ed5ffd41595396db5
Screengrab via Reddit

These remain as unfinished strings with lorem ipsum text filler, however. This shows that Valve might be keeping true to its promise of trying to improve the game’s new user experience. There are no videos or images indicating the presence of these tutorials right now, though, so it’s difficult to gauge how far along these features are and when they might appear.

While Dota 2‘s viewership numbers remain on the upswing, the player count has gone in the opposite direction. While it can be chalked up to the game’s age, a large proportion of the burden falls on Valve’s shoulders for its consistent oversight at a properly functioning tutorial system.

The game does have rudimentary tutorials in place that teach the players the basics of the game, such as movement, attacking, and casting spells. But with the game consistently seeing additions such as Shrines, Outposts, and neutral items, or unapparent mechanics such as backdoor protection and stacking camps, the current learning package deserves an overhaul.

Part of the problem comes from when newbies jump into multiplayer games, however, since lower-ranked matchmaking has become infested with smurfs.

Valve has tried to combat the smurfing problems repeatedly and is also keeping an eye on creating a better new player experience. These “missions” could help entice more players and aid in reviving the game for the less hardcore crowd.