Apex Legends champion Vantage as she appears in official promo art for the game.
Provided by EA

120 FPS support in Apex Legends, explained

This long-awaited request will have to wait even longer.

Apex Legends players have been longing for 120 FPS support to arrive as an in-game option on next-gen (now current-generation) consoles ever since they released. The demand for it has increased tenfold since Sony and Microsoft started rolling out 120 FPS support in other games, too.

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Does Apex Legends have 120 FPS support for consoles?

Bangalore running from a mortar strike in Apex Legends.
Glorious 120Hz has arrived for console players. Image via EA

The long-awaited 120Hz update for Apex Legends has arrived! Season 20, which kicked off early in 2024, finally introduced the option to play 120Hz on consoles. Players on current-gen consoles, namely PS5 and Xbox Series X/S, can activate the graphic boost.

With the desired update live now, you can jump right in and try Apex Legends in 120Hz. The question is whether you’ll want to and, more importantly, will you like it.

Tip:

While it is frustrating that PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X have somewhat limited options when it comes to video settings in Apex Legends, you can, thankfully, adjust your field of view (FOV). Simply opening the game’s settings and heading to the video tab will allow you to adjust your FOV and even FOV Ability Scaling to your liking.

Why do players want 120 FPS in Apex Legends?

Why is it such a popular request? Well, it’s a must-have feature for competitive players who have grown increasingly frustrated with being hard-locked at 60 FPS. Not having as many frames puts them at a distinct disadvantage against PC players.

PC users can set their refresh rate to however high their monitors can, which in turn also increases their FPS, especially if they have a powerful rig or lower their graphics settings to maximize FPS. For example, a PC player with a 240Hz refresh rate monitor can play with 240 FPS—four times the standard 60 FPS rate on consoles.

Console players, on the other hand, are bound by the 60 FPS cap regardless of what monitor they’re using. This, of course, changed once Respawn made it possible for players to change the limit in-game.

Why players aren’t happy with the 120Hz mode

Reactions on the 120Hz mode in Apex are underwhelming, and there are a few crucial reasons for that. Firstly, players have reported a significant drop in the visuals after they switched to 120Hz. This issue primarily impacted distant objects and, for most gamers, couldn’t be addressed even by adjusting settings like FOV to optimal values.

Secondly, the 120Hz mode impacts aim assist, but not to the player’s detriment. In fact, switching to 120Hz makes aiming easier, which might not sound like a problem. However, the change is controversial since it could impact performance in combat, giving some players an unfair advantage over others.


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Author
Joey Carr
Joey Carr is a full-time writer for multiple esports and gaming websites. He has 6+ years of experience covering esports and traditional sporting events, including DreamHack Atlanta, Call of Duty Championships 2017, and Super Bowl 53.