All Player Tags and Motivations in Madden 23 franchise mode explained

Franchise mode just got a lot deeper.

Image via EA

Madden 23 is focused on giving players deeper and more complex gameplay mechanics in the game’s franchise mode. Part of that is accomplished through Player Tags and Motivations, new features that will fundamentally change the way you play the game mode.

What are Player Tags and Motivations? They’re labels the game affixes to certain players that can affect several things, including how they receive XP, how teams will behave in the trade and free agent market, and whether or not you can sign a player. Gone are the days when you can just attract a player with more money than other teams in the league, and new Player Tags might lead you to sign players you wouldn’t think twice about in earlier games.

Ultimately, mastering these new features will be the key to success in your next Madden 23 franchise. If you’re looking to get ahead of the competition, check out our guide below for details on what each Player Tag and Motivation means, and how it will affect your game.

All Player Tags in Madden 23 explained

Screengrab via EA

Player Tags specifically affect players on any given team and how the game functions around them. Certain tags can boost their XP, while other tags might bump them up on a depth chart, and still more will make more teams go after players with trade offers. There are nine different Player Tags in Madden 23, and knowing what they all do is important for building your team.

  • Award Winner: When a player wins an award at the end of the season, they get the Award Winner tag placed on them. These will be league-wide awards, such as the MVP. During free agency, more teams will want to sign players with the Award Winner tag.
  • Bridge Player: If a player with the Bridge Player tag is a starter for their team, the team will try to draft a replacement for them, and players with the Future Starter tag will move ahead of Bridge Players on depth charts
  • Bridge QB: The Bridge QB tag is the same as the Bridge Player tag, but only for the quarterback position.
  • Day 1 Starter: Players with the Day One Starter tag privilege players with high ceilings over older players that might have slightly better overall ratings than them. Usually, Day Obe Starters are high draft picks that will develop into star players, and teams won’t look to replace them as easily as other players.
  • Franchise QB: Think of the best QBs in the NFL. Usually, those players get the Franchise QB tag. Teams with a Franchise QB won’t try to draft a replacement for them or sign a free agent that will compete for their job.
  • Future Starter: This tag is much like the Day One Starter tag, but is usually a little bit further down the food chain in terms of overall rating when they enter the league. Future Starters will also get bumped above older players with similar ratings on the depth chart, and they also receive more XP during training.
  • Mentor: Players with the Mentor tag are more sought-after in free agency by teams, and if a team has a player with the Mentor tag, all the players that play that player’s position will get extra XP every week.
  • QB of the Future: QB of the Future is essentially the same as a Day One Starter, but for QB.
  • Trade Target: A Trade Target player will get put on the trading block.

Knowing how all of these tags can affect and boost your franchise is important, so pay attention when you see a player with a Player Tag affixed to them.

All Motivations in Madden 23 explained

Screengrab via EA

Motivations affect what a player values when you’re trying to sign them. It’s not all about money anymore (although money is still part of it). All players have different motivations in franchise mode, and many have multiple motivations that are ranked in order of importance to the player.

If you’re really trying to sign a player to your team, check out their motivations first to see if you can deliver what that player is really looking for. If you can’t, and you still want the player, you might just have to overpay them to try to override their other motivations. Like we said before, money definitely still matters.

  • Big Market: The player prefers to play in a big market, usually some of the biggest cities in the United States. 
  • Close to Home: The player wants to play for teams that are located close to where they’re from.
  • Head Coach Historic Record: The player prefers to play for a team whose coach has a winning track record.
  • Highest Offer: Money is king to these players. They just want to play for whoever gives them the biggest contract offer.
  • Historic Championships: The player prefers to play for teams that have won championships in the past.
  • Mentor at Position: The player wants to play for a team that has a player with the Mentor tag in their position.
  • No Income Tax: The player wants to play in a state where there’s no state income tax. In the NFL, that means they want to play for the Buccaneers, Dolphins, Cowboys, Texans, Seahawks, or Raiders.
  • Scheme Fit: The player wants to play for a team whose scheme fits them.
  • Super Bowl Chase: The player wants to play for a team that has a good chance at winning the Super Bowl.
  • Team Has Franchise QB: The player wants to play for a team that has a Franchise QB.
  • Top of the Depth Chart: The player wants to play for teams where they will be number one on the depth chart in their position.
  • Warm Weather State: The player wants to play in a place where the weather is good. Sorry, Green Bay and Buffalo.

Before you go pinning your hopes on signing a free agent or trying to re-sign an important part of your franchise, check their motivations. If they don’t line up with your team and you don’t have a bunch of extra cash laying around, you may need to look for other options.