Best non-mechanical double-faced cards in MTG’s Innistrad: Midnight Hunt

You'll want to stay on these creatures' good side.

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Innistrad is known for its double-faced cards and most follow one of two mechanics for transforming: Daybound and Disturb.

But there’s one cycle of five uncommon double-faced cards that don’t play by Innistrad: Midnight Hunt’s standards. 

All of the creatures have a converted mana cost between one and three, and a distinctly unique way in which they transform into their powerful backside.

Here are the best non-mechanical double-faced cards in MTG’s Innistrad: Midnight Hunt.

Delver of Secrets

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This one-drop Blue double-faced card is a highly powerful reprint that could find its way into the Standard metagame.

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The card has been a staple in modern Grixis (Red/Blue/Black) and Izzet (Red/Blue) tempo decks in the past, and it might see play in some more controlling standard decks now.

Deathbonnet Sprout

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For just one mana, this Green double-faced card has a powerful transformed state. But it might require some work to get it transformed in the first place.

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In the right type of creature-heavy deck, Deathbonnet Sprout has the potential to quickly become its 3/3 form and grow every turn. Meanwhile, exiling a card from any graveyard could help you prevent pesky recursion and graveyard play by your opponent.

Vengeful Strangler

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Vengeful Stranger might not get much use in Constructed play, but it could be a form of pseudo-removal for an aggressive Limited deck.

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If allowed to attack every turn, the two-drop Black card will get in for two damage every turn. But if your opponent decides to kill it, the enchantment on its opposite side will prove to be extremely annoying to whoever you’re playing against.

Flame Channeler

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Flame Channeler will likely be difficult to use in Limited formats because of a lack of consistency you’ll have when trying to deal damage with spells.

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If this card sees much, or any, play, it will be in spell-heavy Constructed decks that want to storm off. Look for this to be tested out in Blue and Red decks that want to deal damage with spells.

Bereaved Survivor

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Bereaved Survivor will most likely be used in a Limited setting exclusively. For three mana, the card’s base value is underwhelming. But if you’re able to trigger a flip for it, bringing back creatures from your graveyard could give you the board state advantage you need.

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Dauntless Avenger’s trigger requires it to attack and you can only get back a low mana cost card. You probably won’t see this card played much, even in Draft or Sealed.