Jul 30 2016 - 7:00 pm

Splyce secure unlikely second spot as EU LCS playoffs decided

Splyce concluded their improbable EU LCS run with a second place finish, securing themselves a bye to the playoff semifinals
Callum Leslie
Weekend Editor, Dot Esports.

Splyce concluded their improbable EU LCS run with a second place finish, securing themselves a bye to the playoff semifinals.

With just one game left to play, Splyce have locked in a top finish and currently sit just two points behind leaders G2 Esports. Each team has won nine matches so far this season.

With G2 and Splyce assured of the top spots, Fnatic, H2k-Gaming, Giants Gaming, and Unicorns of Love secured the four other playoff spots after Vitality and Schalke 04 dropped points in their respective matches. Both could only manage a tie against G2 and Giants respectively.

At the other end of the table, a loss to Splyce saw Origen consigned to the relegation tournament ahead of the 2017 Spring Split, just nine months after reaching the semifinals of the World Championships.

Fnatic may have secured a playoff spot, but their draw against bottom side Roccat continued their streak of four matches without a win.

Only two teams' fates are not sealed: Vitality and Schalke currently sit in joint seventh place. As fate would have it, the two teams play each other today. The winner will retain their spot in the LCS, while the loser will join Origen and Roccat in the relegation tournament. 

Jan 19 2017 - 7:00 pm

Collegiate League of Legends headed to Big Ten Network

Are college esports about to take off?
Callum Leslie
Weekend Editor, Dot Esports.
Image via Riot Games

Collegiate League of Legends is coming to television for the first time, thanks to a new partnership between Riot Games and the Big Ten Network.

A dozen of the Big Ten's schools will compete in a new league, which gets underway Jan. 30. The finals will be broadcast on the Big Ten Network itself, the conference's television station available in up to 100 million homes across North America.

Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Northwestern, Ohio State, Purdue, Rutgers, and Wisconsin will be competing in the league. The teams will be split into east and west conferences playing best-of-three round robin matches, with the top four teams in each conference competing in single elimination playoffs.

Though no details have been released about any kind of prizepool, all 72 players in the league will receive a $5,000 scholarship payment for participating in the league.

The league will be broadcast online by both the Big Ten Network and Riot Games on their respective online platforms. Teams will play from home up until the finals themselves on Mar. 27.

The extended partnership between the two parties follows the BTN Invitational at PAX East in Boston last March, where Ohio State took on Michigan State.

The partnership between BTN and Riot is just the latest development in the growth of collegiate esports, and will be the second televised event after Blizzard's Heroes of the Dorm was broadcast on ESPN2 in both 2015 and 2016.

Collegiate Starleague, one of the biggest organizers of college esports, currently operates competitions across eight games, most recently adding Madden to its lineup.

Jan 20 2017 - 9:02 pm

The Blood Moon hangs in the sky—and Blood Moon Jhin could be League’s next skin

In an eerie tweet, Riot hints at the next champion in the Blood Moon skin line.
Aaron Mickunas
League of Legends Writer
Images via Riot Games | Remix by William Copus

The latest skin in the League of Legends Blood Moon skin series, Blood Moon Jhin, could be in the works.

Earlier today Riot tweeted out a teaser, in which the crimson moon can be seen through an archway of sorts with Jhin’s gun suspended in the air, making it almost certain that he’s the next champion to receive a Blood Moon skin. The red haze covering the scene really adds to the creepy factor.

The Blood Moon skins have been pretty awesome—even the early iterations of the series like Akali’s Blood Moon skin. The Blood Moon skins are all colored red in some way, and feature demon masks based on “The Red Demon”—a version of Japanese “oni” which is a spirit that brings strife, disease, disasters, and deceit. In addition to Akali, there have been five more skins in the series: Thresh, Yasuo, Kennen, Kalista, and Shen. Jhin’s will hopefully be no exception to that pattern of awesomeness.

If the skin turned out to be a dud the community wouldn’t take it too kindly. Why? Well, two reasons. First of all, the community has been asking for another Jhin skin since his launch in January last year. He has only had the skin he was launched with, High Noon Jhin, since he actually came out. It is a pretty cool skin, but fans want more. If they finally see Jhin get his new skin and it sucks? Well, I’m sure you can imagine how that would go down.

With ADC mains sending death threats to Riot staff over not enjoying ADC gameplay, imagine what they’d do if their favorite champion received a bad skin. And that brings us to the second point. Jhin is one of the favorite ADCs in the game right now.

Jhin sports almost an 18 percent rate of play, which means he is in nearly one-fifth of all ranked games. In the ADC role, there are only three other ADCs that compete with that play rate out of nearly 20 ADC champions: Vayne, Caitlyn, and Ezreal. I know you were expecting me to say “Ziggs,” but Ziggs isn’t played all that much in the bot lane (yet).

Fortunately, Riot’s skins have been very cool lately. Just look at the Worldbreaker skins, and even the new Lunar Revel set. With the track record of those awesome skins and the previous Blood Moon skins, we’re hoping Blood Moon Jhin will be as badass as it deserves to be.