May 5 2015 - 6:33 am
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The CLG OffSeason - Coaching Changes

The CLG OffSeason CLG as a League of Legends organization has been scrutinized in the recent weeks due to obvious failures to perform, both on an in-game level and on a management level.
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The CLG OffSeason

CLG as a League of Legends organization has been scrutinized in the recent weeks due to obvious failures to perform, both on an in-game level and on a management level. Many players have been criticized, as well as HotShot himself. In order to look at the specifics in terms of the coaching aspect, it's important to be able to use what we've learned from CLG in the past under their current management, as well as what we've learned from other teams. The current direction CLG is going to decide their next head coach will lead to another split of failure, on the basis of their ongoing management issues.

Similar to Gambit this split and Copenhagen last offseason (most notably), CLG is taking applications for their open headcoaching position. The Copenhagen Wolves are the best example of a team that has performed this well. Their team showed great improvement by making the playoffs, dropping in the opening stage to the 3rd place team. Dentist (CW's coach) has shown great synergy with his players and seems to have decent coaching methods. Teams have even picked up players this way, most notably TSM picking up Santorin this split. This method of finding new talent seems pretty decent, with the downside being that the management still has to choose who to place on their team. It's probably easy to narrow down the list of applicants a fair bit, but once it starts getting close, the management still has to be good at scouting to add a decent name into the role. Already we can see why CLG should not be using this method. This is the method for teams who make the right decision at least half of the time. Being generous, most would put CLG somewhere between 20-40% good decisions, which isn't really decent to gamble on.

At this point, when it comes to coaching, CLG isn't in a position to gamble. But is their a method for a team with bad decision-making? There's an example from real-world sports that answers this question. In La Liga, the major soccer league in Spain, there are two teams that have consistently been at the top of the league for the past decade, Barcelona and Real Madrid. Barcelona is a team that usually makes small, precise moves. They have an academy team that they fund a lot of money into to try to grow and maintain their own talent. When Barcelona does make roster moves/transfers, they're usually gambles that pay off due to Barcelona's good team management. Real Madrid would have to be the opposite. Real Madrid doesn't fund an academy team, and they don't scout for potential star players. Real Madrid spends millions of dollars to get players that are already proven stars onto their team (as much as $128.5 million on a player). CLG doesn't have millions of dollars, nor do they need to buy out Faker from SKT. What they need is a proven coach. Too bad there aren't any proven coaches in need of a team at the moment. Definitely not someone who coached the #1 team in Europe last year or anything like that. Except there is. If CLG wants to win NA, then they need to be willing to give up any amount of viable money for Leviathan to become the coach of their team. This isn't from a synergetic standpoint --because who knows how much authority he would have-- but from an “in need of real coaching talent” standpoint, there should be no question that CLG needs Leviathan.

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