Jan 15 2015 - 1:56 pm

Counter-Strike update reverts nerf that was never announced

Valve's latest update to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive has reverted a change that was never announced to begin with
Dot Esports

Valve's latest update to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive has reverted a change that was never announced to begin with.

When Valve released a patch for the popular first-person shooter last week, the main highlight was the adjustment made to the CZ-75 sidearm, by far the most divisive weapon in the game.

But while most attention was on the handling of the CZ-75, another pistol was also affected as well. The number of ammunition clips for the P250 was reduced. In theory, this was as far as changes to the game’s weapons went.

In fact, the same adjustment made to the P250 was also made to the P2000 sidearm, and this change went unannounced.

The number of ammo clips included with either pistol was reduced to three in the update. This might seem a small change on the surface, but it has the potential to dramatically affect the opening rounds of matches when all players are wielding only pistols and exchanges can sometimes be drawn out with plenty of reloading.

Having only three clips meant carefully conserving ammo in such situations. But that won’t be a concern anymore, as an additional update released less than a week later has reverted the change.

It’s an altogether strange situation. Valve’s patch notes offer that the gun’s ammo capacity has been “fixed,” implying that the original change was unintended. In spite of this indication, it’s hard to imagine the giant game developer accidentally extending a change made to one of the game’s weapons over to another.

Valve hasn’t clarified whether the original change was purposeful or not. The P250’s ammo clip count remains reduced.

The update also included a number of fixes for the map Cobblestone, which has become a staple in tournament play since Valve reintroduced it to is active list of competitive maps. These fixes include addressing clipping issues and the smoothening out of areas referred to as “sticky.”

Image via adreN_TV/YouTube

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